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fireworks safety indiana

Know Indiana Fireworks Laws And Have a Safe Fireworks Season

This weekend kicks off the unofficial start of summer and along with that comes an increase in the use of fireworks. Area residents are reminded that Indiana has several laws governing fireworks and many town and cities have additional ordinances that citizens must follow.

In addition to laws, common courtesy when lighting fireworks goes a long way in avoiding neighborhood conflicts. Letting neighbors know your plans is a great idea or, better yet, why not invite your neighbors to join in the fun? Remember, not all your neighbors, especially those with young children or different work hours, enjoy the loud noises produced by fireworks.

The basic rule of thumb for fireworks use by residents in unincorporated areas of Hamilton County is that fireworks may be ignited from 9am-11pm on most nights with an extension on holidays, including Memorial Day. Fireworks may only be used on a person’s own property or on the property of a person who has given permission. Lighting fireworks in a street or in a parking lot is not permitted. Juveniles under the age of 18 must have an adult present to use or possess fireworks.

Towns and cities may have further restrictions on times or locations fireworks may be used so residents should seek advice from local agencies.

Indiana State Law (IC 22-11-14-6) Violations; offenses; time and dates of allowable usage of consumer fireworks

Sec. 6. (a) A person who recklessly, knowingly, or intentionally violates section 2(f), 4.5, 5(c), 5(d), 7, 8(a), 8(c), 8(d), 10, or 11(c) of this chapter commits a Class A misdemeanor.

(b) A person who ignites, discharges, or uses consumer fireworks at a site other than:
(1) a special discharge location;
(2) the property of the person; or
(3) the property of another who has given permission to use the consumer fireworks; commits a Class C infraction. However, if a person recklessly, knowingly, or intentionally takes an action described in this subsection within five (5) years after the person previously took an action described in this subsection, whether or not there has been a judgment that the person committed an infraction in taking the previous action, the person commits a Class C misdemeanor.

(c) A person less than eighteen (18) years of age who possesses or uses a firework when an adult is not present and responsible at the location of the possession or use commits a Class C infraction. However, if a person possesses or uses a firework when an adult is not present and responsible at the location of the possession or use within five (5) years after a previous possession or use by the person as described in this subsection, whether or not there has been a judgment that the person committed an infraction in the previous possession or use, the person commits a delinquent act under IC 31-37.

(d) A person who ignites, discharges, or uses consumer fireworks:
(1) after 11 p.m. except on a holiday (as defined in IC 1-1-9-1(a)) or December 31, on which dates consumer fireworks may not be ignited, discharged, or used after midnight; or
(2) before 9 a.m.;
commits a Class C infraction. However, if a person recklessly, knowingly, or intentionally takes an action described in this subsection within five (5) years after the person previously took an action described in this subsection, whether or not there has been a judgment that the person committed an infraction in taking the previous action, the person commits a Class C misdemeanor.

(e) A person who recklessly, knowingly, or intentionally uses consumer fireworks and the violation causes harm to the property of a person commits a Class A misdemeanor.

(f) A person who recklessly, knowingly, or intentionally uses consumer fireworks and the violation results in serious bodily injury to a person commits a Level 6 felony.

(g) A person who recklessly, knowingly, or intentionally uses consumer fireworks and the violation results in the death of a person commits a Level 5 felony.

(h) A person who knowingly or intentionally fails to collect or remit to the state the public safety fees due under section 12 of this chapter commits a Level 6 felony.

The Indiana Personal Injury Attorneys at Glaser & Ebbs are skilled at representing clients and their family members injured in personal injury accidents. It often takes legal action to receive fair compensation in these cases.  Contact Glaser & Ebbs to learn more about your legal rights and options.

Source: Nixle